Sauber (Sauber Petronas) PDF Print E-mail

Sauber (Sauber Petronas)


Base: Hinwil, Switzerland
  
Seasons: 13 (1993-2005)
World Championships: 0
Grand Prix entered: 218
Grand Prix starts:214/424
Wins: 0
Poles: 0
Fastest Laps: 0
Podiums:6
Points: 195
  

Statistics (1993 to 2005)

Driver

Grands prix for Sauber

Points for Sauber

   
JJ Lehto (FIN/1993–1994)185
Karl Wendlinger (AUT/1993–1995)2511
Heinz-Harald Frentzen
(GER/1994–1996/2002–2003)
6442
Andrea De Cesaris (ITA/1994)91
Jean-Christophe Boullion (FRA/1995) 113
Johnny Herbert (GBR/1996–1998) 4820
Nicola Larini (ITA/1997) 51
Gianni Morbidelli (ITA/1997) 70
Norberto Fontana (ARG/1997) 40
Jean Alesi (FRA/1998–1999) 3211
Pedro Diniz (BRA/1999–2000) 323
Mika Salo (FIN/2000) 166
Nick Heidfeld (DEU 2001–2003) 5025
Kimi Räikkönen (FIN/2001) 179
Felipe Massa (BRA/2002/2004–2005) 5327
Giancarlo Fisichella (ITA/2004) 1822
Jacques Villeneuve (CAN/2005)199
Total 428195
   

Championship points and Constructors’ Championship placings

Season

Grands prixPointsPosition
    
199316127th
1994 16128th
1995 17187th
1996 16117th
1997 17167th
1998 16106th
1999 1658th
2000 1768th
2001 17214th
2002 17115th
2003 16196th
200418346th
2005 19208th
Total 216 (428 starts)195 
    
    


Heiz-Harold Frentzen, Sauber, 2003

Beetling along.
It all began by chance. Peter Sauber wasn’t really interested in motor sport,
but a friend persuaded him to have some tuning work done on his VW Beetle. In 1967 Sauber entered a few club races with it, but it was above all his interest in tinkering with cars that was sparked – so strongly, indeed, that in 1970 the qualified electrician decided to set himself up independently as a constructor of open two-seater race cars. He designed the Sauber C1 in the cellar of his parents’ house and took the initial letter of his wife Christiane’s name as the model designation. In the same year he won the Swiss Championship with the C1, but subsequently only raced on and off.
By the time Sauber strapped on his helmet for the last time in 1973, his focus had already turned entirely to the construction side. The “C” was retained as a trademark, and by 2005 he had got as far as the C24. On linguistic grounds there was no C10 (which sounds odd in German), but along the way appeared a sports car named the C291.

One-two in Le Mans.
The first major successes began in the late 1980s after Sauber had managed to persuade Mercedes to return to international racing. Highlights of the partnership with the Stuttgart carmaker were a one-two finish in the 1989 Le Mans 24 Hours as well as winning the Manufacturers’ and Drivers’ title twice in the World Sports Car Championship of the time (1989 and 1990).
Among the drivers who earned their racing spurs under Sauber’s aegis were three who went on to become Formula One aces: Michael Schumacher, Heinz-Harald Frentzen and Karl Wendlinger.
Sauber began preparations for Formula One in 1991. When the Mercedes-Benz and PP Sauber AG partnership were debating their racing future in the early 1990s with the demise of the World Sports Car Championship in prospect, it was decided over the summer of 1991 to turn Formula One
into a joint project. Preparations in Stuttgart and Hinwil were making good progress and initially there seemed no reason not to embark on this new venture. It thus came as a severe blow to Peter Sauber when, in November 1991, the Mercedes executive board decided against a Formula One involvement for the foreseeable future.

Leap into the unknown.
So what was to become of the recently completed high-tech facility in Hinwil, the far-reaching racing expertise and the staff already hired with the Formula One project in mind? In January 1992 Peter Sauber decided to go it alone – albeit with financial and technical support from Mercedes, but at the same time taking on a considerable personal risk.
Nevertheless, on 14th March 1993 two Sauber C12 cars were on the Kyalami grid, as planned, ready for the start of the South African GP. JJ Lehto’s fifth-placed finish made it a debut to celebrate. Prior to that, just four teams in the history of Formula One had picked up points in their maiden race.
Contracts with Red Bull and Petronas provided a solid foundation from 1995 on, enabling the Swiss team to establish itself as a firm fixture of Formula One.

Sauber-Petronas C24
2001 – a bumper year.
It took some time for the breakthrough to come, but then in 2001 three highlights in the team’s history followed in quick succession: the partnership with the major Swiss bank Credit Suisse, confirmation of fourth place in the Constructors’ Championship in mid-October and, a few days later, the groundbreaking ceremony for the company’s own wind tunnel.When Sauber entered Formula One in 1993, it had a workforce of fewer than 70. In 2005, 275 specialists were working exclusively on Formula One at the 6,900-square-metre Hinwil development centre and the adjacent wind tunnel. Moreover, numerous suppliers in the region were benefiting from commissions coming from the racing team. Compared to 1993, the annual budget had grown fourfold within a decade.From 1993 through to 2005 the Sauber Team entered 216 out of 218 grands prix. The two races they missed were the 1994 Monaco GP, following Karl Wendlinger’s serious accident, and the 2000 Brazilian GP, from which the team withdrew for safety reasons after rear wing fractures were found during practice. Balanced against 257 completed races, 93 of which brought in championship points, there were 169 retirements. Eight of these occurred at such a late stage that the drivers were nevertheless classified – JJ Lehto even coming fourth at Imola in 1993.
Theoretically the total line-up of 17 Sauber drivers should be able to claim a tally of 432 race starts, but they only managed 428 as there were four ccasions when only one driver entered the race. A convalescing Karl Wendlinger missed out on the Spanish GP in 1994, while Johnny Herbert had to watch the restart in Australia in 1996 from the trackside after previously being involved in
a pile-up. Gianni Morbidelli missed out on the Japanese GP in 1997 because of a hand injury sustained during practice, and in 2003 Heinz-Harald Frentzen failed to make the restart in Austria due to a clutch failure.

Six podium places.
The team’s best results are three third places. On two occasions victory seemed within grasp: at the 1996 Monaco GP, Heinz-Harald Frentzen was in a promising position but ended up in fourth place after colliding with Eddie Irvine’s Ferrari while trying to pass him, and later dropping further back on account of two extra pit stops. At the 1999 French Grand Prix, Jean Alesi spun off a wet track and out of the race just before the Safety Car came out.

Sauber by Sauber

A byword for Swiss motor racing.
It all began in 1970 when electrician Peter Sauber set up his own business and began building open two-seater sports cars. It was during this time that he constructed the Sauber C1 in the cellar at his parents’ house. The model designation derived from the first letter of his wife Christiane’s name. With the C1, Sauber went on to win the Swiss Championship, but subsequently only put in sporadic race appearances.
By the time Sauber hung up his helmet in 1973, his focus had already turned entirely to the construction side. The “C” was retained as a trademark, and by 2005 Sauber had got as far as the C24. For linguistic reasons there was no C10 (it sounds odd in German), but along the road there appeared a sports car named the C291.

Success with sports cars.
The first major successes began in the late 1980s after Sauber had managed to persuade Mercedes to return to the race track. Highlights of the partnership with the Stuttgart carmaker were a one-two finish in the 1989 Le Mans
24 Hours and two consecutive wins of the Manufacturers’ and Drivers’ title in the World Sports Car Championship (1989 and 1990). Among the drivers who earned their racing spurs under Sauber’s aegis in 1990 and 1991 were three who went on to become Formula One aces: Michael Schumacher, Heinz-Harald Frentzen and Karl Wendlinger. Sauber’s Formula One venture began almost 15 years ago. When the Mercedes-Benz and PP Sauber AG partnership was debating its racing future in the early 1990s with the demise of the World Sports Car Championship in sight, the subject of Formula One was soon tabled and firmed up as a joint project during the summer of 1991.
Preparations in Stuttgart and Hinwil proceeded apace and there seemed no reason not to embark on the new venture. It thus came as a heavy blow to Peter Sauber when, in November 1991, the Mercedes executive board decided against a Formula One involvement for the time being.

Formula One as a solo venture.
It left Peter Sauber sitting on the brand-new high-tech facility established in Hinwil, the comprehensive racing expertise that had been developed with Formula One in mind and the staff taken on to run the project. In January 1992 he resolved to go it alone – albeit with financial and technical support from Mercedes, but also taking on board the considerable personal risk of joining the sorry ranks of Formula One failures made in Switzerland.
Nonetheless, 14th March 1993 saw two Sauber C12 cars – as planned – lining up in Kyalami for the South African GP. JJ Lehto’s fifth-placed finish turned it into a debut worthy of celebration. In the history of Formula One, there had only been four teams previously who had collected points in their maiden race.
Contracts with Red Bull and Petronas from 1995 provided a solid foundation and enabled the Swiss team to establish itself as a firm fixture of Formula One.

Jacques Villeneuve, Sauber, 2005

Fourth in the 2001 World Championship.
It was some time before the breakthrough came, but in 2001 there were suddenly three highlights in the team’s history following hot on each other’s heels: a partnership with the major Swiss bank Credit Suisse, confirmation of fourth place in the Constructors’ Championship in mid-October, and a few days later the groundbreaking ceremony for the company’s own wind tunnel.
When it entered Formula One in 1993, Sauber had a staff of less than 70.
In 2005, around 300 experts were working exclusively on Formula One at the 6,800-square-metre Hinwil complex that comprises the development centre and the adjacent wind tunnel. In addition, almost 200 suppliers in the Hinwil region benefit from commissions coming from the racing team. Compared to 1993, the annual budget has grown fourfold within a decade.

Sauber
From 1993 through to 2005 the Sauber Team contested 216 out of 218 grands prix. The two races they missed out on were the 1994 Monaco GP following Karl Wendlinger’s serious accident and the 2000 Brazilian GP, from which the team withdrew for safety reasons after rear wing fractures were discovered during practice. Balanced against 257 completed races, which earned the team 93 champion¬ship points, there were 169 retirements. Eight of these occurred at such a late stage that the affected drivers were nevertheless classified – JJ Lehto even coming fourth at Imola in 1993.
In theory the line-up of 17 Sauber drivers should be able to claim 432 race starts, but they only managed 428 since there were four occasions when only one driver took part in the race. A convalescing Karl Wendlinger missed out on the Spanish GP in 1994, while in 1996 Johnny Herbert was forced to watch the restart in Australia from the trackside after being involved in a pile-up. Gianni Morbidelli passed up the Japanese GP in 1997 due to a hand injury sustained during practice, while 2003 saw Heinz-Harald Frentzen fail to make the restart in Austria due to a clutch failure.

Six podium places.
Six third places are the team’s best results. On two occasions victory seemed within grasp. At the Monaco GP in 1996, Frentzen finished fourth after colliding with Eddie Irvine’s Ferrari while attempting to pass him and later dropping further back on account of two extra pit stops. In France in 1999, Jean Alesi spun off a wet track and out of the race just before the safety car was sent out.

Last Updated on Thursday, 11 February 2010 19:46
 

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